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Creating a Culture of Giving

Have you heard about ‘Giving Tuesday?’ In the wake of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Giving Tuesday, which occurred this week, is a day focused on giving, not getting.  It sets the tone for a holiday season filled with generosity and goodwill

Have you heard about ‘Giving Tuesday?’  In the wake of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Giving Tuesday, which occurred this week, is a day focused on giving, not getting. It sets the tone for a holiday season filled with generosity and goodwill. The holiday season is traditionally a time when families come together to celebrate and give thanks. So, how can you make sure that the season of giving doesn’t end on December 25th? It is a question we receive often from families. How do we make giving a part of our family’s lifestyle? Here are a few  suggestions that can help you and your family weave the culture of giving into your lives.

  1. Talk About Giving. This is the most important thing we can do to create a culture of giving in our families. We believe this so strongly that we created a game to help you initiate regular conversations in your family. Keep the game in the car or at the dinner table and invite your kids, siblings or parents to pull a card for discussion. The game would be a great stocking stuffer for your family and friends.  You can also follow the game online. We update the Question of the Week regularly.
  2. Monthly Family Giving Calendar. Experts say that repetition makes habits. And we also know that if something is on the calendar, we are more likely to do it. By creating a family giving calendar in which you have scheduled an act of giving for each month of the year, helping others will stay at the top of your priority list.
  3. Sharing Birthdays. Kids get lots of stuff for their birthdays. Instead of having friends bring another $15 gift that will end up under the couch in the playroom, ask them to bring something that will be of use to someone else and plan a charitable birthday party. Help your child decide what they would like to give and what organization they’d like to give to.  Always popular with kids are animal welfare organizations and the Children’s Hospital.
  4. Make a Pledge. Similar to planning a monthly family give, we can make a financial pledge. By making a promise to regularly share our treasure, we not only get into the habit of including giving in our budgeting but we open the door for important financial planning lessons.

So, perhaps you should add a giving calendar to the presents that are under your tree, and add a question to the top of the box – “If you had $100 and had to give it away, who would you give it too?”  Enjoy!